TINTYPE OF 10TH VIRGINIA MAJOR KILLED AT CHANCELLORSVILLE WITH SEVEN IMAGES OF FAMILY MEMBERS

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Item Code: 622-412

This group of seven tintypes and one paper image are all CDV sized and all but two have a paper frame. All of the images relate to Major Joshua Stover of the 10th Virginia Infantry who was killed in action at Chancellorsville.

The first image in the group is a waist-up view of Major Stover. He is shown seated and wearing a light-colored double-breasted frock coat and holding a dark kepi in his lap. His beard obscures any rank that might be on his collar. Contrast and clarity are excellent and his cheeks are lightly tinted. Paper frame has some discoloration from dirt or moisture.

Next is a woman believed to be Major Stover’s wife. She is shown from the waist up and posed seated with her hands in her lap. She wears a dark dress with a light-colored print decoration along with a waist sash and buckle. Her cheeks are lightly tinted. Contrast and clarity are excellent. Paper frame has some discoloration from dirt or moisture. Corners have been clipped.

There is also an image of a younger man in a civilian suit that may be Major Stover before the war but we are not sure. The subject is shown from the waist up and wears a medium-colored jacket and vest with a white shirt and black bowtie and sports a mustache. Subjects cheeks are lightly tinted. Contrast and clarity are excellent. Paper frame has some discoloration from dirt or moisture. Corners have been clipped.

The next four images are all of children. It is known that Major Stover had three sons.

The first is a tintype of a baby seated on the lap of an adult male. The child looks to be a year or so in age. The next is a bust view of a male child perhaps six-months or so old and the third is a full view of a less than six month old baby propped up in a chair. All three are tintypes with paper frames that show minor staining along the top edge. The fourth image is of a young boy approximately 6 or 7 years old seated in a chair. All images have good contrast and clarity with only one being a bit blurry.

The last image in the group is a tintype of an older gentleman circa 1870’s. He wears a black suit jacket with a light vest. Clarity and contrast are good. There is no paper frame and the corners are clipped.

None of the images have photographer’s imprints or writing on the reverse. The image of Major Stover is confirmed by other known images found on findagrave.com and other websites.

Joshua Stover was born April 29, 1824 in Strasburg, Virginia. He served in the Mexican War from 1847-1848 and on December 6, 1853 he married Mary Jane Crabill.

He was commissioned captain of the “Strasburg Grays” which would become Company A, 10th Virginia Infantry on April 18, 1861. He was present at 1st Manassas and McDowell before being promoted to major on May 9, 1862. He then served at Winchester, Front Royal, Strasburg, Malvern Hill and Cedar Mountain before being wounded to an undetermined degree at 2nd Manassas on August 28, 1862.

It is not clear if Major Stover was present for the Antietam Campaign but he was present at Chancellorsville where he was killed in action on May 3, 1863. He was buried in the Lacy family cemetery at Ellwood with Captain James Keith Boswell of Stonewall Jackson’s staff and General Jackson’s amputated arm. Major Stover was later moved to the Confederate Cemetery in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Photos come with copies of Stover’s records from the National Archives and article that mentions him being buried in the same cemetery as Stonewall Jackson’s arm.

Some further research may reveal this to be a nice little family archive of a brave Confederate officer.  [ad][ph:L]

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