CIVIL WAR ISSUE L.J. & I. PHILLIPS CONTRACT FORAGE CAP WITH 4th INFANTRY INSIGNIA

$3,250.00

Quantity Available: 1

Item Code: 1052-161

Shipping: Determined by Method & Location of buyer

To Order:
Call 717-334-0347,
Fax 717-334-5016, or E-mail

This cap had some conservation work done, but displays well. The interior lining of the sides of this cap was shredded and had new fabric added, but the polished cotton fabric on underside of the crown was intact, as was the original contractor’s paper label and both were preserved intact. The label is missing a corner at upper right and with some losses along the lower edge, but the full text is intact, reading, "Size No 4 / 7 1/8 / U.S. Army. / L. J. & I. Phillips." Lewis J. and Isaac Phillips of New York had huge army contracts for caps every year of the war, furnishing some 35,000 in 1861, 175,000 or more in 1862, 251,000 in 1863, 330,200 in 1864, and even 50,000 on a contract of January 1, 1865. The forage cap was the typical headgear of the Union soldier, and if there was a typical forage cap, it was likely one by L.J. & I Phillips.

This is the typical issue pattern for enlistedmen and what some collectors refer to as a Type-II, having a fairly boxy profile, wide top, and flat visor. The cap is fitted with an original Civil War issue stamped brass hunting horn and numeral 4, indicating a 4th Infantry regiment. The chinstrap is in place, secured by two small general service eagle buttons, and is a common issue pattern using a floating friction buckle that acts against the loops on either end of the two-piece chinstrap.

The cap has good color and is solid. It shows some repairs to conceal moth damage by inserting and gluing down a matching piece of fabric underneath: on wearer’s right at top near crown, mid-right and right rear; center line at rear, left rear, and upper left near crown. The interior has the embossed goatskin sweatband in place. The lining in the side was replaced and shows a plain surface with remnants of the original stitched to it, but the glossy, polished cotton at the top is original and preserved the original label.

The forage cap was adopted army wide in 1858 and descended from the prewar shako, at least as it looked after exposure to the elements. They were intended to be worn on “fatigue” duties with the Hardee hat serving as the dress hat, but it is the forage cap that is the most recognizable piece of Civil War headgear and a key piece in any Civil War collection or display. They were so common as to become scarce: most soldiers probably went through several of these in their army service and few thought to preserve them. Those that were kept usually met their fate in doing chores around a farm or were simply discarded over the years by the veteran or his family. Those in government stockpiles were sold off as the army was reduced and regulations changed, and surplus dealers advertised them as cheap workman’s caps for years after. This is a scarce survivor.  [sr][ph:m]

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THIS ITEM, AS WITH ALL OTHER ITEMS AVAILABLE ON OUR WEB SITE,

MAY BE PURCHASED THROUGH OUR LAYAWAY PROGRAM.

CLICK HERE FOR OUR POLICIES AND TERMS.

THANK YOU!

Inquire »

Inquire About CIVIL WAR ISSUE L.J. & I. PHILLIPS CONTRACT FORAGE CAP WITH 4th INFANTRY INSIGNIA

For inquiries, please email us at [email protected]

featured item

VERY RARE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 84th REGIMENT, ROYAL HIGHLAND EMIGRANTS, CARTRIDGE BOX PLATE, ONE OF FIVE KNOWN

This is one of five known examples of the rare cartridge box plate worn by the Royal Highland Emigrants, the 84th Regiment of Foot, in the Revolutionary War. These are identical to the plates worn by the 71st Regiment and were certainly produced by… (844-32). Learn More »

Upcoming Events

27
Feb
Instagram